Posts Tagged Eastern Cottontail Rabbit

Wonder Spouse Photo Extravaganza

A firefly rests on a volunteer Morning Glory.

A firefly rests on a volunteer Morning Glory.

You’re in luck, loyal blog readers. Wonder Spouse found himself with some time this weekend, and he spent much of it post-processing the backlog of yard and garden photos that he had accumulated. All of the shots in this entry were taken in one morning in early September, as summer plants were fading, and autumn fruits and flowers were starting to appear. Remember that you can click on any photo to see a larger version.

Late summer through early fall is the peak bloom period for one of my favorite moisture-loving wildflowers: Jewelweed. Here’s a clump blooming on our floodplain:

The deer eat it, but sheer numbers ensure its reappearance each growing season.

The deer eat it, but sheer numbers ensure its reappearance each growing season.

You really need a close view to appreciate the delicate beauty of the flowers:

So gorgeous!

So gorgeous!

Late summer is always adorned with lobelias in my yard. Some are planted deliberately, but many randomly pop up without any input from me. I do take the ripe seed pods each fall and walk about the yard sprinkling tiny cinnamon-colored seeds as I go.

The deep scarlet of a Cardinal Flower contrasts with the gray tree trunk behind it.

The deep scarlet of a Cardinal Flower contrasts with the gray tree trunk behind it.

Equally breath-taking are the Great Blue Lobelias — same genus as the Cardinals, but a different species.

What's not to love about these deep blue towering beauties?

What’s not to love about these deep blue towering beauties?

Seed production was getting serious in early September when Wonder Spouse took these photos. Check out his gorgeous close-up of a Bigleaf Magnolia Seed Cone:

Magnolia macrophylla seed cone

Magnolia macrophylla seed cone

The Jack-in-the-Pulpits in the wetland still held on to their ragged-looking leaves, but they were being pulled down by the weight of their bright red fruits.

Bright red Jack-in-the-Pulpit fruits are easy to spot among the dominant greens and browns in the wetland.

Bright red Jack-in-the-Pulpit fruits are easy to spot among the dominant greens and browns in the wetland.

One Joe Pye Weed cluster was still blooming just a bit:

Joe Pye Weeds finishing their bloom cycle.

Joe Pye Weeds finishing their bloom cycle.

While a large one in the front yard was all feathery seed head:

Joe Pye Weed seed head

Joe Pye Weed seed head

The seeds of these River Oats made a nice resting spot for this little butterfly.

The butterfly is some kind of skipper, I think. I'm not good at identifying them.

The butterfly is some kind of skipper, I think. I’m not good at identifying them.

I don’t think I’ve ever written about my Garlic Chives. This easy-to-grow herb sends up lovely flowers every late summer. The leaves have a more assertive onion flavor than Chives.

Ornamental and tasty Garlic Chives

Ornamental and tasty Garlic Chives

Pollinators always swarm the Garlic Chive flowers when they open.

Fireflies seem especially fond of the flowers of Garlic Chives.

Fireflies seem especially fond of the flowers of Garlic Chives.

As is always the case, we encountered a few animal residents as we wandered our five acres that morning.

The Eastern Cottontail clan had a productive year, thanks to our abundant rainfall.

The Eastern Cottontail clan had a productive year, thanks to our abundant rainfall.

Web worms create unsightly webs in the trees, but never seem to negatively impact their hosts.

Web worms create unsightly webs in the trees, but never seem to negatively impact their hosts.

Cicadas thrummed their summer chants as usual. We spotted this shed skin during our wanderings.

Cicadas thrummed their summer chants as usual. We spotted this shed skin during our wanderings.

An American Toad didn't appreciate our accidental intrusion into his territory.

An American Toad didn’t appreciate our accidental intrusion into his territory.

And, finally, to close this impressive display of Wonder Spouse’s photographic skills, one of our many dragonflies. This large one was briefly resting on our TV cable line high above us, making for a positively artistic shot.

Most of the dragonflies left about the same time that Summer officially departed.

Most of the dragonflies left about the same time that Summer officially departed.

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Wishing Debby would change her mind

Sunflower “Sun Samba” Mix

Oh sure, the garden is thriving right this second. But I see Big Trouble heading this way like a runaway freight train. I’m talking about the 100+ degree heat wave promised for my area in two short days. Right now, the weather seers are calling for at least four days in a row with highs over the 100-degree mark, and five days in a row could easily happen.

I wouldn’t be so worried, if I had gotten the rainfall that so many folks in my region have been blessed with lately. But I didn’t; not even close. Take last night, for instance. A cold front uncharacteristically strong for this time of year blasted through, bringing a line of thunderstorms to just about every yard but mine. I’m really trying not to take the rain snubs personally, but it’s getting harder and harder.

My remaining Y-Star patty pan squash continues to produce well…for now.

Absolutely no rain is in the forecast during the heat wave. Only the slightest of chances are hinted at for a WEEK FROM NOW! That means my already-too-dry soil is going to be baked by a merciless summer sun without any respite except what I can provide with my hose.

Fortex pole beans mingle happily with Spitfire nasturtiums…but for how much longer?

I water my vegetable garden from a shallow well that draws from a perched water table overlaying my floodplain. It is not doing well; neither is the adjacent creek. Neither are the oak trees nearby; they are dropping young acorns by the hundreds in an attempt to reduce their water consumption. I am not sure how much longer I’ll be able to water my vegetables.

Trees that produce fruit early in the season have been more successful than the oaks. For example, my Florida Anise-trees bloomed prolifically this year, and their fruit set has never been so significant. When the seeds inside the fruits ripen, I’m going to carry them down to the floodplain and spread them around to see if new trees will appear next year.

Florida Anise-tree Fruits

I spent an hour in the uncharacteristically cool morning air thoroughly watering all the veggies. I’m hoping the good dose of water while it’s cool will allow the roots to maximize their use of the water, rather than lose it all to evaporation.  I’m hoping this will fortify the plants against the imminent heat wave. I’ll water again in two days, next time at dawn so I don’t melt — if the well holds out.

Every summer now I go through this agony, wondering how long the well will hold out. Will there be enough so that the tomatoes — just beginning to ripen in numbers — can be harvested? Will the peppers have time to ripen? How long will the beans keep producing? When will the bugs overpower heat-weakened squash plants?

My yard has been in a drought for so many years now that I do not remember the last time my creek ran all summer long, when muddy spots on the floodplain would sink tractor tires during mowing, when summer nights were often accompanied by lightning flashes and pounding rain on the roof.

I know the poor folks in Florida are drowning in Tropical Storm Debby’s rains right now. How wonderful it would be if I could wish those clouds here. Five inches? No problem; that’s what floodplains are for. Piedmont topography and soils are better able to handle such amounts.

By this time next week, I expect to be hunkered down in a darkened house as I hide from searing sun and dream, dream, dream of rain.

This bunny was outside my garden fence today wiggling its nose at the scent of well-watered veggies and flowers.

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First Fruits of Summer

Two Raven Zucchinis, Three Spineless Perfection Zucchinis, and Two Y-Star Patty Pans

Yes, it’s that time, folks, when squash shows up nightly on the dinner menu, and the aroma of baking zucchini bread fills the house with cinnamon-squash goodness. With today’s harvest, summer produce is officially in the house.

Wonder Spouse and I have been working hard to get the vegetable garden weeded and mulched for the season, and we’re nearly done, I’m happy to report. That’s good, because as you can see above, the summer vegetables are cranking bigtime.

And well they should be. Our high temperatures are mostly hovering in the mid to upper 80s, with nighttime lows in the middle to upper 60s. Combined with heavy, humid air and occasional thunderstorm rain, these are close to ideal growing conditions for the summer garden. We did get a bit of pea-sized hail the other afternoon, but it wasn’t heavy enough to do any harm that I could see. Compared to areas near me, I’m still low on rainfall, so I am providing extra water to the squashes (big moisture consumers) and the last of the spring veggies still struggling to hang on.

Here’s a shot of the Rainbow Chard, which is all that’s left of my lovely bed of greens. The lettuces and spinaches all bolted for the sky when the 80-degree temperatures settled in.

Rainbow Chard is still productive

After I took this picture, I harvested almost all of the big leaves you see here. I’ve never grown this veggie before, and I’m not sure how much longer it can withstand summer weather, so I figured I’d pick as much as I could while it still tastes good.

I haven’t pulled up the Sugar Sprint Snap Peas yet, but their productivity has slowed to a crawl. If I stop seeing any flowers, I’ll compost them. The beets still seem to be growing well. I’m trying to keep them moist, in the hopes that the beet roots will expand a bit more before I must harvest them.

Beets and carrots in front, rainbow chard in back, and a basil in the middle

The tomatoes are all taller than me now; their fruits grow larger — and more numerous — daily. I find I must tie new growth to the trellises every other day. My tomato experiment this year is a new variety called Indigo Rose. The amount of purple pigment produced in the fruit depends entirely on how much sun reaches the fruit. Here’s one plant that gets a lot of sun:

Note how the fruits are mostly purple

Compare that picture with a shot of another plant of the same variety that is sited where it gets more shade:

Only the very tops of the fruits of this shaded Indigo Rose are turning purple.

Whatever degree of purple these fruits attain, I think they’ll look amazing in salads. I sure hope they taste good.

Meanwhile the Fortex Pole Beans have already shot over the top of their 6-foot trellis. Last year, these beans grew up and over the trellis, and then some of the vines started back up again. Given how early we are in the season, I’m thinking this year’s beans may overwrap the trellis multiple times. This makes for very challenging bean-harvesting conditions, because it’s hard to spot the beans hiding deep within the mass of foliage. A taller trellis wouldn’t solve my problem; I can barely reach the top of this one.

You can just about hear them shouting, “To infinity and beyond!”

The Jade Bush Beans were slow to get going, but are now starting to look fairly respectable. We love the flavor of these beans, which is why I still grow them, despite the complaints my knees make when I’m harvesting them.

Jade Bush Beans in foreground, squashes behind

And, as you can see from the first shot of this entry, all three squash varieties are producing with almost frightening enthusiasm.

Y-Star Patty Pan Squash

Raven Zucchinis have darker skin than most other varieties, including:

Spineless Perfection Zucchini — it does seem less prickly

That concludes this vegetable garden update, but I want to close with two more photos I took this morning.

First up is this young cottontail rabbit that was dining on clover growing in my driveway. Apologies for the blurriness, but the bunny was wiggly. Note the dark spots on its ears. Those are ticks, which is not only gross, but also explains why my front flower garden is so full of ticks that I can’t walk through it without picking up several. Yikes!

Young bunny with tick-infested ears

And I’ll close on a more aesthetic note. I grew this yarrow from seed years ago, and because, like most yarrows, it tends to spread itself around, its pretty pink flowers still adorn the edge of my vegetable garden every year. The nice thing about yarrow is that you can hack it back as much as you need without ever killing it.

Pink yarrow — tough and pretty

As Memorial Day weekend begins, I hope all my readers will be enjoying their yards and gardens as much as I am enjoying mine. Happy Summer, everyone.

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